Welding Program

Student learning welding techniques.

Job Outlook

Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.
Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program

Employment of welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers is projected to grow 6 percent from 2012 to 2022.

Employment growth reflects the need for welders in manufacturing because of the importance and versatility of welding as a manufacturing process. The basic skills of welding are similar across industries, so welders can easily shift from one industry to another, depending on where they are needed most. For example, welders laid off in the automotive manufacturing industry may be able to find work in the oil and gas industry.
The nation’s aging infrastructure will require the expertise of welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers to help rebuild bridges, highways, and buildings. The construction of new power generation facilities and, specifically, pipelines transporting natural gas and oil will also result in new jobs.

Job Prospects

Overall job prospects will vary with the worker’s skill level. Job prospects should be good for welders trained in the latest technologies. Welding schools report that graduates have little difficulty finding work, and many employers report difficulty finding properly skilled welders. However, welders who do not have up-to-date training may face strong competition for jobs.

For all welders, job prospects should be better for those willing to relocate.

Certificates

These certificates will prepare students for entry-level or promotional opportunities in the field of welding. The courses are designed to provide students with current technologies used in this industry. Students will participate in identifying, planning and implementing strategies to correctly weld materials in a variety of applications.

Overview for College Success Credits
OCS 121 Overview for College Success 1
Overview for College Success (OCS 121) is a class that will help you plan and assist you in becoming a better student and support you in your work/life balance. OCS 121 credit is not calculated in the course minimum credit totals listed in this section.
Multi-Process Welding Certificate – WLD.BASIC.MPRO Credits
BLD 130 General Welding 4
MFG 102 Manufacturing Math 2
BLD 106 OSHA 30 1.5
WLD 103 Blue Print Reading for Welding 1.5
WLD 104 SMAW I (Shield Metal Arc Welding I) 2
WLD 106 SMAW 2 (Shield Metal Arc Welding II) 2
WLD 110 GMAW I (Gas Mental Arc Welding I) 2
WLD 111 GMAW 2 (Gas Mental Arc Welding II) 2
WLD 112 GTAW I (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding I) 2
WLD 113 GTAW 2 (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding II) 2
Total Credit Hours 21

 

Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) Certificate – WLD.BASIC.SMAW Credits
BLD 130 General Welding 4
WLD 104 SMAW I (Shield Metal Arc Welding I) 2
WLD 106 SMAW 2 (Shield Metal Arc Welding II) 2
Total Credit Hours 8

 

Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) Certificate – WLD.BASIC.GMAW Credits
BLD 130 General Welding 4
WLD 110 GMAW I (Gas Mental Arc Welding I) 2
WLD 111 GMAW 2 (Gas Mental Arc Welding II) 2
Total Credit Hours 8
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) Certificate – WLD.BASIC.GTAW Credits
BLD 130 General Welding 4
WLD 112 GTAW I (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding I) 2
WLD 113 GTAW 2 (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding II) 2
Total Credit Hours 8

For more information, contact the Building Construction & Industrial Technology department at (708) 596-2000 ext. 2664.